Saint Macrina

I’ve been reading about the life of Saint Macrina for my class and there’s a few things about her life that have really stuck out to me:

She was born in to a wealthy family and didn’t really need to do much with her life other than travel around and take care of the various riches that were hers to inherit.  Instead of using her resources to lead a life of pomp she quietly served her mother, gave her finances to the church, and worked hard with her hands all of her life so that she could personally provide for others.

From her childhood onward she memorized the psalms and recited them daily as she performed chores for her mother and she also helped raise her brothers and taught them to read from the scriptures.  Without a doubt the scripture saturated lessons of Macrina would have done much to build up her family members and we should not be surprised to see the famed Basil of Caesarea and Gregory the bishop of Nyssa in the ranks.

The narrative told by her brother Gregory goes on to show that God worked many miracles through Macrina; healings, food supply, prophecies, etc.  But her fame wasn’t for the miracles but rather the reason that many people flocked to her was because of her humble generosity, which then lead to them hearing the gospel and being saved.

Macrina lived a simple life of helping her family members and working hard with her hands to be generous to others without taking advantage of her birthright and God used her powerfully in her day for bringing people to Christ and also in the raising up pillars in the faith.  She’s a testimony that God is interested in using faithful Christians who aren’t looking for the limelight to accomplish His tasks and display His glory in this world.  She’s been an encouragement and a reminder to me of the simple humble faith that our Lord desires.

Her story can be found here:

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/pearse/morefathers/files/gregory_macrina_1_life.htm

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About salutations75

Born and raised Atheist turned Reformed Baptist.
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